• Cisco AnyConnect SSL/TLS Trustpoint

    I wanted to put together a quick tutorial for setting up a Cisco ASA – AnyConnect with SSL/TLS. I’ve done it a few times and I always have to re-lookup each step and the order in which to do it, so why not make a quick post about it to remember!

    Optional: Destroy Current Trustpoint

    You will have to destroy or clear out the current trustpoint if it already exists. This must be done if you are going to re-generate the key, which is best practice when renewing a Certificate due to expiration or one that has been compromised.

    • It will warn you that it will destroy any certificates within the trustpoint.
    Generate a Key

    Here we start with the generation of our key, using 2048 bits. the key name can be anything you want, but I like call it by the service I will be putting it on, for my case for this tutorial is accessthejimmahknowscom.key

    Setting up the trustpoint locale and generate a CSR for submission

        First we need to set up a trustpoint object, with our locale properties, etc

    • newtrustpoint.trustpoint — The name I gave to this trustpoint which will tie everything together.
    • subject-name This command holds the distinguished name of the Certificate’s profile, see RFC3039
    • keypair — This is what key to pair the trustpoint with, we generated this in the previous step.
    • fqdn — This is the main FQDN of our service that will use the trustpoint
    • enrolment terminal — This tells the Cisco ASA to output the CSR (which we will create in the next step) to the terminal screen. Otherwise you will have to SFTP to the ASA and download it.

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  • Easy Cisco AnyConnect SSL VPN with Cisco ASA

    As promised here is my article on how to setup a SSL remote VPN, an alternative to IPSec Remote VPN from this article. What’s great is the steps to setup an SSL remote VPN service are very similar to IPSec remote VPN!! So let’s get started.

    As with IPSec remote VPN we will need similar design considerations for SSL remote VPN.

    • First, a subnet is required for client’s to be put on when successfully authenticated and authorized via the SSL remote VPN. This can be the same subnet as one already existing on your network or a separate one with a firewall in-between The later being best in practice and security.
    • Secondly, deciding on split-tunneling vs all-tunneling. The difference being on the client would you like all traffic to be forced across the tunnel or allow clients to communicate with both their local network and the networks on the otherside of the VPN. For best practice and security, all-tunneling is recommended.
    • Third, Access Lists and tunneled networks. Here we will decided what SSL remote VPN users will have have access to in our other networks. We will also, in the case of split-tunneling, create an access-list of what networks to tunnel for the Remote VPN user.
    • Fourth, provisioning standard network services for VPN user’s. Remote VPN user’s will need a default gateway, DNS servers, domain suffix, an address pool, proxy settings, etc.

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  • Easy Remote Client VPN Solution with a Cisco ASA

    I’ve posted an article on Client VPN setup using OpenVPN and I noticed I didn’t have one regarding Cisco ASA. A Cisco ASA being a very common Security Appliance used by small and large companies. This article will cover how to setup a standard remote client VPN utilizing IPsec as the crypto carrier. Cisco also has their own proprietary remote client VPN solution called AnyConnect. I will be posting an article after this one on how to set an AnyConnect solution up and include what the differences are between it and the standard IPsec remote client VPN contained in this article.

    A remote client VPN is something very common in workplace now-a-days. It allows users to appear as if they are on the company’s internal network over an insecure medium(e.g. Internet, untrused Network, etc). It does so by using IPsec. IPsec is a tried and true Layer 3 securing technique that requires both parties involved to mutually authenticate each other before passing traffic.

    A few things to keep in mind regarding remote client VPNs.

    • First, a subnet is required for client’s to be put on when successfully authenticated and authorized via the remote client VPN. This can be the same subnet as one already existing on your network or a separate one with a firewall in-between The later being best in practice and security.
    • Secondly, deciding on split-tunneling vs all-tunneling. The difference being on the client would you like all traffic to be forced across the tunnel or allow clients to communicate with both their local network and the networks on the otherside of the VPN. For best practice and security, all-tunneling is recommended.
    • Third, Access Lists and tunneled networks. Here we will decided what Remote VPN users will have access to other networks. We will also, in the case of split-tunneling, create an access-list of what networks to tunnel for the Remote VPN user.
    • Fourth, provisioning standard network services for VPN user’s. Remote VPN user’s will need a default gateway, DNS servers, domain suffix, an address pool, proxy settings, etc.

    [Read More…]